Medical Beam Laboratories, LLC
Advanced Robotic Radiosurgery Solutions 
Research
Innovative Medical Research & Development
Our Research
Beam Lab is a Clemson University spin-off company, and many of our technological developments resulted from university research.  The members of our research team hail from a variety of backgrounds: physics, engineering, computer science and medical industry.  We are passionate about providing quality research that allows us to develop better medical radiation technology.   However, we also strive to provide research and development to other companies and universities worldwide. 
 

Monte Carlo Simulations

Our research team performs Monte Carlo simulations on Clemson University's Palmetto Cluster, a high-performance computing resource, to model and obtain insight into the operations of radiation systems. We use software developed by CERN, called GEANT4, which is a platform for "the simulation of the passage of particles through matter" to ensure the validity of our computer models.  With these tools our team is capable of producing reliable and competitive research necessary for the development of better radiation technology.
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Electron Beam Ion Trap

In collaboration with Clemson University's Electron Beam Ion Trap (CUEBIT) facility, our team looks to fully understand how monochromatic x-rays interact with biological material, such as neoplasm and stem cell cultures, so we can develop better technologies for radiation oncology.  In order to study these interactions, our team developed an ultra high vacuum x-ray irradiation port that generates monochromatic x-rays adjacent to a cell culture.  We aspire to use our results to target cancer and stem cells at the cellular level. 
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Creative Inquiry

Beam Lab researchers collaborate with a Creative Inquiry group at Clemson University to understand how radiation interacts with and affects biological material at the atomic level.  We believe that understanding the physical interactions on this scale will lead to insights that will let us apply current technologies better, while allowing us to develop new radiation techniques and technologies for medical applications.  Our team designed and manufactured a radiation safety box that fluoresces quasi-monochromatic x-rays onto a cell culture.  Bioengineering and physics students are combining their efforts to generate exciting results with this device, and their preliminary results are promising.
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